Grammar

What’s the Difference Between Much, Many, Little, and A Lot?

RULE:  “Many” is used with countable plural nouns like “children” and “students.” “Much,” on the other hand, can only be used with uncountable nouns like “money” or “homework.” “A lot” can be used with both.          Many RULE: Use “many” with plurals. INCORRECT: There were much people waiting in line. CORRECT: There were many

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Learn Grammar and Vocabulary through Music Videos

A fun way to  learn English is by listening to and singing songs. Pop songs deal with personal and dramatic themes that people are drawn to. They also employ advanced grammar and vocabulary.  Check out this selection of music videos on the Virtual Writing Tutor. Listen to the song and fill in the blanks or

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6 Common ESL Errors

One thing I have become acutely aware of while working on the VirtualWritingTutor.com ESL grammar checker is just how common some errors are in college students’ writing. I see the same errors day after day, year after year. I could easily come up with a list of about 100 common errors that college students should avoid, but

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Aspect Error

What is an aspect error? Rules and Examples RULE: Use the Present Progressive to represent an action that is progress. Use the Simple Present for actions that repeat, like routines and habits. Adverbs of frequency like every day, often, sometimes, and never indicate that an action repeats, so you should use the Simple Present. INCORRECT:

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Make no sense or have no sense?

When can I say have no sense and make no sense? Is have no sense ever correct? One of my students wrote this sentence in a narrative writing assignment: I tried to explain to him that this situation just have no sense. Can you see what the problem is? In fact, he has made two errors in one. The first is a

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Sentence Fragments, a Run-On Sentences and a Comma Splices

Punctuation errors are easy to make and hard to spot. For some writers, it is especially hard to catch punctuation errors such as sentence fragments, run-on sentences, and comma splices. These punctuation errors can really make your writing seem chaotic. A grammar checker can catch these errors some of the time. Better than a grammar

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Eggcorns

Definition and Examples of Eggcorns What is an eggcorn? DEFINITION: An eggcorn is a word or phrase that results from a mishearing or misinterpretation of another. INCORRECT: I would like an expresso and an ice tea, please. CORRECT: I would like an espresso and an iced tea, please. INCORRECT: We can fix this with a bit of duck tape. CORRECT: We can

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